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May 31, 2007

Upcoming Library Events

Brown Bag Book Discussion: Final Exam: A Surgeon's Reflections on Mortality by Pauline W. Chen (New York: Alfred Knopf, 2007)

Tuesday, June 5
12 Noon - 1 PM and repeated 5 - 6 PM
University Library Balcony

Bring your lunch!

Pauline Chen is a surgeon and a former UCLA medical school faculty member. Chen writes lucidly about the healthcare system's struggle with accepting death as a "good" outcome in medical care, and her own struggle to care for dying patients.

Moderator: Paul Blobaum. Contact Paul by email: p-blobaum@govst.edu or by phone: 708-534-4139


FREE!! Library Workshop FREE!!
PowerPoint Basics
Learn how to: Create Slides, Add Images, Add Transition & Animation etc.

WHAT DAY: Tuesday, June 5th
WHAT TIME: 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
WHERE: Room D2401B in the Library
Everybody is welcome.

For a list of upcoming workshops, click here.


Posted by d-nadler at 10:54 AM | Comments (0)

A Cure For "Lookinginal Thewrongplaces Syndrome"

Friday, June 1st
8:30 a.m. - 12 Noon
D34115

Today's program will feature the work of Illinois Librarians and the information resources of the National Library of Medicine and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine.

8:30 a.m. Registration (free) and coffee

9 - 10:15 MedlinePlus and the National Library of Medicine's Consumer Health Information Program
MedlinePlus is the National Library of Medicine's online library of authoritative and current health and illness information for the public. MedlinePlus includes freely accessible dictionaries, drug information, surgical videos, and patient education tutorials. Visit MedlinePlus online at http:medlineplus.gov.

Presenter: Tammy Mays, Consumer Health Coordinator, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, the University of Illinois Library of the Health Sciences, Chicago.

10:15 - 10:45 a.m. Farewell to the Exhibit Coffee and Refreshments
Reception Sponsored by the Chicago and South Consortium of Health Science Libraries

10:45 AM - 12 Noon The Health-E Illinois Project

Research indicates that as more Americans come online, more rely on the Internet for important health information. The Pew Internet & American Life Project has documented that over 80 percent of Americans who use Internet, use it for health information. Their research shows that this information influences patient care. Join Illinois librarians from all types of libraries in exploring the impact that libraries are having on making sense of online health information, and how we can all work together to expand access to authoritative health information to all citizens of Illinois. Health-E Illinois, also known as "MedlinePlus Go-Local", is a project to connect the National Library of Medicine's MedlinePlus information with local health and human service provider information across Illinois.

Presenters: The Health-E Illinois Project Team, Library of the Health Sciences, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University, Chicago. Logan Ludwig, Ph.D., Associate Dean, Project Director, and team members Mary Klatt, Tom Bartenfelder, and Eugene Giudice.

Please contact Paul Blobaum at p-blobaum@govst.edu or 708-534-4139 for more information.

For more information on the Changing the Face of Medicine Exhibit, click here.

Posted by d-nadler at 10:42 AM | Comments (0)

Today in History: May 31st

From This Day in History: History.com

1775: Mecklenburg Resolutions reject the power of the British in North Carolina
On this day in 1775, the committeemen of Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, meet and respond to news of the Battles of Lexington and Concord, the first battles of the American Revolution, with a series of 20 patriotic resolutions. Finish reading the article.

May 31,1859: Big Ben goes into operation in London
The famous tower clock known as Big Ben, located at the top of the 320-foot-high St. Stephen's Tower, rings out over the Houses of Parliament in Westminster, London, for the first time on th ...
View video clip.

1962: Architect of the Holocaust hanged in Israel
Near Tel Aviv, Israel, Adolf Eichmann, the Nazi SS officer who organized Adolf Hitler's "final solution of the Jewish question," was executed for his crimes against humanity. Finish reading the article.

Search the Library catalog for books on the above topics.

Posted by d-nadler at 10:20 AM | Comments (0)

Today in History: May 30th

From the World Almanac:

1431: French heroine and leader Joan of Arc is burned at the stake by the English after having been convicted of heresy.
1498: Christopher Columbus sets sail on his third voyage, visiting Trinidad and the coast of Venezuela.
1854: The Kansas-Nebraska Act becomes law, leaving the issue of slavery to the vote of settlers.
1868: Memorial Day is observed for the first time, on the order of Gen. John Alexander Logan, for the purpose of decorating the graves of the American Civil War dead.
1909: The National Conference on the Negro opens, leading to the founding of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).
1922: The Lincoln Memorial is dedicated in Washington, DC.
1943: In World War II, the U.S. infantry retakes the Aleutian Islands from the Japanese after 3 weeks of fighting.
1966: The U.S. launches the lunar probe Surveyor 1, which makes a soft landing on the moon and sends back thousands of photographs.
2002: During an emotional ceremony, one final girder is removed from the World Trade Center clean-up site in New York City.

Posted by d-nadler at 10:16 AM | Comments (0)

Today in History: May 29th

From the World Almanac:

1453: In a battle that marks the end of the Byzantine Empire, Constantinople falls to the Turks, who rename it Istanbul.
1660: Charles II is restored to the English throne, marking the restoration of the monarchy after 11 years as a commonwealth under Oliver Cromwell.
1790: Rhode Island becomes the 13th state to ratify the Constitution.
1848: Wisconsin is admitted to the Union as the 30th state.
1932: World War I veterans launch the Bonus March on Washington, DC, to demand that Congress pay their bonuses in full.
1953: Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay become the first mountain climbers to reach the summit of Mount Everest.
1985: British soccer fans go on a rampage at the European Cup Final in Brussels, Belgium , killing some 40 people and injuring 400.
1919: Arthur Eddington confirms Albert Einstein’s light-bending prediction and consequently his theory of relativity.

Posted by d-nadler at 10:13 AM | Comments (0)

May 25, 2007

New Reference Books for May

If you need assistance locating a book, please come to the Reference Desk. We will assist you in locating the book.

Calumet beginnings : ancient shorelines and settlements at the south end of Lake Michigan / Kenneth J. Schoon.
REF. F547.C7 S3652003

Handbook of narrative inquiry : mapping a methodology / editor, D. Jean Clandinin.
REF. H61.295 .H362007

Encyclopedia of career development / editors, Jeffrey H. Greenhaus, Gerard A. Callanan.
REF. HF5381 .E5172006

The handbook of marketing research : uses, misuses, and future advances / edited by Rajiv Grover, Marco Vriens.
REF. HF5415.2 .H2862006

The Cambridge dictionary of sociology / general editor, Bryan S. Turner.
REF. HM425 .C362006

The aging network : program and services / Donald E. Gelfand.
6th ed.
REF. HV1461 .G442006

The Palgrave Macmillan dictionary of political thought / Roger Scruton.
3rd ed.
REF. JA61 .S372007

Grandparents’ rights : your legal guide to protecting your relationship with your grandchildren / Traci Truly.
4th ed.
REF. KF547.Z9 T782005

RIA federal tax regulations
REF. KF6276.99 R332007

Encyclopedia of educational leadership and administration / Fenwick W. English, editor.
REF. LB2805 .E5272006

The SAGE handbook of research in international education / edited by Mary Hayden, Jack Levy, Jeff Thompson.
REF. LC1090 .S242007

The SAGE handbook of special education / edited by Lani Florian.
REF. LC3965 .S242007

The how-to manual for rehab documentation : a complete guide to increasing reimbursement and reducing denials / Rick Gawenda.
REF.RA395.A3 G362007

Substance abuse : a comprehensive textbook / editors, Joyce H. Lowinson ... [et al.].
REF. RC564 .S8262005

Alcoholism sourcebook : basic consumer health information about alcohol use, abuse, and dependence, featuring facts about the physical, mental, and social health effects of alcohol addiction, including alcoholic liver disease, pancreatic disease, cardiovascular disease, neurological disorders, and the effects of drinking during pregnancy; along with information about alcohol treatment, medications, and recovery programs, in addition to tips for reducing the prevalence of underage drinking, statistics about alcohol use, a glossary of related terms, and directories of resources for more help and information / edited by Amy L. Sutton.
2nd ed.
REF. RC565 .A44932007

Practical manual of physical medicine and rehabilitation / Jackson C. Tan.
2nd ed.
REF. RM701 .T362006

Assessing reference and user services in a digital age / Eric Novotny, editor.
REF. Z711.45 .A772006


Posted by d-nadler at 12:10 PM | Comments (0)

GSU Library Closed Memorial Day Weekend

The Governors State University Library will be closed:

Saturday, May 26th - Monday, May 28th. Regular hours will resume Tuesday, May 29th.

Click here to see the Library Hours.

Click here to go to the Library Calendar.

Posted by d-nadler at 11:43 AM | Comments (0)

Tuesday, May 29, Lunchtime Film Festival!

Tuesday, May 29
12:15 PM
Library Balcony

Lunchtime Film Festival!

The Vanishing Line (1998)

This film follows physician and filmaker Maren Monsen, and hospice social worker, Jim Brigham, as they visit patients who are making plans concerning their end-of-life care. Dr. Monsen explores how to meet the needs of the dying and their families with the right balance of technology, compassion, and care.

Running Time: 52 minutes

This part of Changing the Face of Medicine: Celebrating America’s Women Physicians, click here for more information.

Posted by d-nadler at 11:39 AM | Comments (0)

Today in History: May 25th

Trivia from: 94.7 Chicago's True Oldies Channel

1787
- The Constitutional convention opened in Philadelphia with George Washington presiding.

Books in the GSU Library:
Title: Decision in Philadelphia : the Constitutional Convention of 1787 / Christopher Collier and James Lincoln Collier.
Call Number: KF4520 .C651986

Search the Library Catalog for more books.

1925 - John Scopes was indicted for teaching the Darwinian theory in school.

Read about John Scopes:
Title: Monkey trial; the State of Tennessee vs. John Thomas Scopes
Call Number: QH369 .G7

1935 - Babe Ruth hit his final three home runs, his 712th, 713th and 714th, and set a record that would stand for 39 years.

1935 - Jesse Owens tied the world record for the 100-yard dash. He ran it in 9.4 seconds. He also broke three other world track records.

Read a book about Jesse Owens:
Title: A picture book of Jesse Owens / David Adler ; illustrated by Robert Casilla.
Call Number: MAT-CTR. GV697.O9 A65 1992

1952 - Operation Desert Rock IV, he US Army's second atomic blast experiment to determine the effects of radion on human subjects took place. More than 1000 enlisted soldiers, who witnessed the explosion just outside the blast range, were exposed to radiation.

1983 - The Return of the Jedi opened nationwide. It set a new record in opening day box office sales. The gross was $6,219,629.

Watch the Star Wars Trilogy:
Title: Star wars trilogy [videorecording] / Lucasfilm Ltd.
Call Number: VIDEO. PN1997 .S7272004

Posted by d-nadler at 11:23 AM | Comments (0)

Today in History: May 24th

Trivia from: 94.7 Chicago's True Oldies Channel

1844 - Samuel F.B. Morse transmitted the message, "What hath God wrought!" from Washington to Baltimore as he formally opened America's first telegraph line.

1883 - The Brooklyn Bridge, linking Brooklyn and Manhattan, was opened to traffic.

1935 - The Cincinnati Reds played the Philadelphia Phillies in the first major league baseball game at night. The switch for the floodlights was thrown by President F.D. Roosevelt.

1976 - Britain and France opened transatlantic Concorde service to Washington.

Posted by d-nadler at 11:19 AM | Comments (0)

Today in History: May 23rd

Trivia from: 94.7 Chicago's True Oldies Channel

1430 - Joan Of Arc was captured by the Burgundians, who sold her to the English.

Books in the GSU Library collection about Joan of Arc:
Title: Jeanne d’Arc, by W. S. Scott.
Call Number: DC103 .S381974

Find more books at GSU.

1785 - Benjamin Franklin wrote in a letter that he had invented bifocals.

Books in the GSU Library about Benjamin Franklin:
Title: Doctor Franklin’s medicine / Stanley Finger.
Call Number: R151 .F562006

Find more books at GSU.

1900 - Civil War hero Sgt. William H. Carney became the first African American to receive the Medal of Honor, 37 years after the Battle of Fort Wagner.

Books in the GSU Library about Fort Wagner:
Title: The storming of Fort Wagner; black valor in the Civil War.
Call Number: MAT-CTR. E513.554TH .W4

Find more books at GSU.

1934 - Bank robbers Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow were shot to death in a police ambush in Bienville Parish, Louisiana.

Video in the GSU Library collection:
Title: Bonnie and Clyde [videorecording] / Warner Bros.-Seven Arts, Inc. and Tatira-Hiller Productions ; directed by Arthur Penn ; produced by Warren Beatty.

Find more books and videos at GSU.

Posted by d-nadler at 11:03 AM | Comments (0)

May 22, 2007

Memorial Day

The Governors State University Library will be closed:

Saturday, May 26th - Monday, May 28th. Regular hours will resume Tuesday, May 29th.

Click here to see the Library Hours.

Click here to go to the Library Calendar.

Posted by d-nadler at 03:40 PM | Comments (0)

Today in History: May 22nd

From Those Were the Days: Today in History:

1761 - The first life insurance policy issued in the United States was issued on this day. Can you think which company it was? Nope. Don’t even try. You’ll never guess. It was the Corporation for the Relief of Poor and Distressed Presbyterian Ministers and of the Poor and Distressed Widows and Children of Presbyterian Ministers. WOW-Zers! Can you image what size their letterhead must have been? It was the CftRoPaDPMaoftPaDWaCoPM ... for short. We wonder how long the policy must have been...

1819 - The steamship Savannah was the first to cross the Atlantic. It sailed from Savannah, Georgia to Liverpool, England. This day is now celebrated in the United States as National Maritime Day.

1868 - The masked Reno Gang pulled off the great train robbery at Marshfield, IN. They hauled in $98,000 in loot.

1967 - What was to become the Public Broadcasting System’s longest-running children’s program, Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, debuted on this day.

1986 - Sylvester Stallone agreed to a 10-picture, six-year deal with United Artists. He signed for a reported $15 million for each film . The deal made him the richest actor in Hollywood.

Click here to go to the Archives if you wish to check previous dates.

Posted by d-nadler at 03:28 PM | Comments (0)

Best Places to Get Free Books - The Ultimate Guide

This list was compiled by:

Friedbeef’s Tech http://www.friedbeef.com/

Best Places to Get Free Books - The Ultimate Guide
To see the list, go to:
http://www.friedbeef.com/2007/04/09/best-places-to-get-free-books-the-ultimate-guide/

Top 10 Best Places to Get Free Books (Part 1)
To see this list, go to:
http://www.friedbeef.com/2007/04/02/top-10-best-places-to-get-free-books-part-1/

Posted by d-nadler at 03:14 PM | Comments (0)

May 21, 2007

A Profile of Military and Civilian Medicine: My Nursing Career from Alabama to Vietnam and Beyond

Monday, May 21
Hall of Honors
7 PM

Everyone is welcome!

Dr. Edwards will also be swearing in a civilian into military service.

Dr. Connie Edwards will share her experiences from her nursing education at Tuskeegee Institute in Alabama, to service in Vietnam in the Army Nurses Corps, through her work in nursing education at Governors State University. Dr. Edwards will also discuss her advocacy work for all military veterans, which includes co-chairing Chicago's celebrated "Welcome Home" parade in 1986 for veterans of the Vietnam war.

Presenter: Dr. Constance Edwards, Associate Professor of Nursing, College of Health Professions, Governors State University.

Posted by d-nadler at 12:49 PM | Comments (0)

Today in History: May 21st

From This Day in History - History.com:

1881: American Red Cross Founded
View video clip.

Read about the founders of the American Red Cross:
Title: Clara Barton : professional angel / Elizabeth Brown Pryor.
Call Number:HV569.B3 P781987

1927: Lindbergh lands in Paris
American pilot Charles A. Lindbergh lands at Le Bourget Field in Paris, successfully completing the first solo, nonstop transatlantic flight and the first ever nonstop flight between New York to Paris. His single-engine monoplane, The Spirit of St. Louis, had lifted off from Roosevelt Field in New York 33 1/2 hours before.

Finish reading the article.

Read a biography about Charles Lindbergh.
Title: Lindbergh alone / by Brendan Gill.
Call Number: TL540.L5 G54

1932: Earhart completes transatlantic flight
Five years to the day that American aviator Charles Lindbergh became the first pilot to accomplish a solo, nonstop flight across the Atlantic Ocean, female aviator Amelia Earhart becomes the first pilot to repeat the feat, landing her plane in Ireland after flying across the North Atlantic. Earhart traveled over 2,000 miles from Newfoundland in just under 15 hours.

Finish reading the article.

Read a biography about Amelia Earhart:
Title: Amelia : the centennial biography of an aviation pioneer / Donald M. Goldstein and Katherine V. Dillon.
Call Number: TL540.E3 G631997


1940: Nazis kill "unfit" people in East Prussia
On this day in 1940, a "special unit" carries out its mission-and murders more than 1,500 hospital patients in East Prussia.

Read the complete article.

Read about the Nazis:
Title: The Hitler file : a social history of Germany and the Nazis, 1918-1945 / Frederic Grunfeld.
Call Number: DD256.5 .G791974

1969: Military spokesman defends "Hamburger Hill"
A U.S. military command spokesman in Saigon defends the battle for Ap Bia Mountain as having been necessary to stop enemy infiltration and protect the city of Hue. The spokesman stated that the battle was an integral part of the policy of "maximum pressure" that U.S. forces had been pursuing for the prior six months, and confirmed that no orders had been received from President Nixon to modify that basic strategy. On May 20, the battle, described in the American media as the battle for "Hamburger Hill," had come under attack in Congress from Senator Kennedy (D-Massachusetts), who described the action as "senseless and irresponsible."

Finish reading the article.

Read about the Vietnam War:
Title: The Vietnam war : an eyewitness history / Sanford Wexler
Call Number: DS557.7 .W481992

Search the Library Catalog for more books available in the GSU Library.

Posted by d-nadler at 11:08 AM | Comments (0)

May 18, 2007

Homeland Security Digital Library (HSDL)

Critical Releases in Homeland Security

Every two weeks, the Homeland Security Digital Library (access this database from Journals & Databases A-Z) identifies "Critical Releases in Homeland Security," a targeted collection of recently-released documents that are expected to influence homeland security policy & strategy development.

Allocation of Ventilators in an Influenza Pandemic: Planning Document
New York (State). Dept. of Health

Avoiding the Plague: An Assessment of US Plans and Funding for Countering Bioterrorism
Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments (Washington, D.C.)

Economic Impact of the Iraq War and Higher Military Spending
Center for Economic and Policy Research

Homeland Security Presidential Directive 20: National Continuity Policy
United States. White House Office

Networked Radicalization: A Counter-Strategy
George Washington University. Homeland Security Policy Institute; University of Virginia. Critical Incident Analysis Group

Transforming the Way DOD Looks at Energy; An approach to Establishing an Energy Strategy
LMI Government Consulting

To access this database, click here.

Posted by d-nadler at 02:51 PM | Comments (0)

A Profile of Military and Civilian Medicine: My Nursing Career from Alabama to Vietnam and Beyond

Monday, May 21
Hall of Honors
7 PM

Dr. Connie Edwards will share her experiences from her nursing education at Tuskeegee Institute in Alabama, to service in Vietnam in the Army Nurses Corps, through her work in nursing education at Governors State University. Dr. Edwards will also discuss her advocacy work for all military veterans, which includes co-chairing Chicago's celebrated "Welcome Home" parade in 1986 for veterans of the Vietnam war.

Presenter: Dr. Constance Edwards, Associate Professor of Nursing, College of Health Professions, Governors State University.

This event is a part of: Changing the Face of Medicine Exhibit. To see a list of all events, click here.

Posted by d-nadler at 02:47 PM | Comments (0)

Explore Health science Careers, Become Part of a Life-Saving Team

Saturday, May 19
10:30 AM - Noon
Sherman Music Recital Hall

Explore the many exciting careers available in the field of Health Sciences in this dynamic and informative presentation. Learn how to research health careers through this PowerPoint and live demonstration. High school youth and adults of all ages will learn what resources to use to find the best fit for personal interests and strengths.

Presenters: Debra J. Kakuk, Associate Professor and Health Sciences Librarian, and Mary S. Konkel, Associate Professor and Head of Technical Services, College of DuPage Library, Glen Ellyn, Illinois.

This event is a part of: Changing the Face of Medicine Exhibit. To see a list of all events, click here.

Posted by d-nadler at 02:42 PM | Comments (0)

Today in History: May 18th

From: The New York Times on the Web - Learning Center:

1804 The French Senate proclaimed Napoleon Bonaparte emperor.

Read about Napoleon:
Title: A life of Napoleon / by Stendhal [i.e. M. H. Beyle].
Call Number: DC203 .B57131977

Find more in the GSU Library.

1896 The Supreme Court endorsed the concept of "separate but equal" racial segregation in Plessy v. Ferguson, a precedent that was overturned in Brown v. Board of Education in 1954.

1969 Apollo 10 was launched on a mission that served as a dress rehearsal for the first moon landing.

1980 the Mount St. Helens volcano in Washington state exploded, leaving 57 people dead or missing. (Go to article.)

Read about Mount St. Helens:
Title: Warning and response to the Mount St. Helens eruption / Thomas F. Saarinen & James L. Sell.
Call Number: QE527.5 .S231985

Find more in the GSU Library.

To read about more events happening on May 18th, click here.

Posted by d-nadler at 02:28 PM | Comments (0)

Today in History: May 17th

From: The New York Times on the Web - Learning Center:

1792 The New York Stock Exchange was founded by brokers meeting under a tree on what is now Wall Street.

1940 The Nazis occupied Brussels, Belgium, during World War II.

1946 President Harry S. Truman seized control of the nation's railroads, delaying a threatened strike by engineers and trainmen.

1954 the Supreme Court issued its landmark Brown vs. Board of Education of Topeka ruling, which declared that racially segregated public schools were inherently unequal. (Go to article.)


1987 An Iraqi warplane attacked the U.S. Navy frigate Stark in the Persian Gulf, killing 37 American sailors. Iraq and the United States called the attack a mistake.

1996 President Bill Clinton signed a measure requiring neighborhood notification when sex offenders move in. Megan's Law was named for 7-year-old Megan Kanka, who was raped and killed in 1994.

2000 Two former Ku Klux Klansmen were arrested on murder charges in the 1963 church bombing in Birmingham, Ala., that killed four black girls. (Thomas E. Blanton Jr. and Bobby Frank Cherry were later convicted and sentenced to life in prison. Cherry died in 2004.)

To read about more events happening on May 17th, click here.

Posted by d-nadler at 02:18 PM | Comments (0)

Today in History: May 16th

From: The New York Times on the Web - Learning Center:

1770 Marie Antoinette, age 14, married the future King Louis XVI of France, who was 15.

1868 - the United States Senate failed by one vote to convict President Andrew Johnson as it took its first ballot on one of 11 articles of impeachment against him. (Johnson was acquitted of all charges.) (Go to article.)

1929 The first Academy Awards were presented during a banquet at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel.

1995 Japanese police arrested doomsday cult leader Shoko Asahara, holding him in connection with the nerve-gas attack on Tokyo's subways two months earlier.

2006 Richard Hatch, who had won $1 million in the debut season of "Survivor," was sentenced in Providence, R.I., to more than four years in prison for failing to pay taxes on his reality TV prize and other income.

For more information on events happening on May 16th, click here.

Posted by d-nadler at 01:16 PM | Comments (0)

Today in History: May 15th

From: The New York Times on the Web - Learning Center:

1911 The Supreme Court ordered the dissolution of Standard Oil Co., ruling it violated the Sherman Antitrust Act.

1940 Nylon stockings went on general sale for the first time in the United States.

1948 Hours after declaring its independence, the new state of Israel was attacked by Transjordan, Egypt, Syria, Iraq and Lebanon.

1970 Two black students at Jackson State University in Mississippi were killed when police opened fire during student protests.

1972 George C. Wallace was shot and left paralyzed by a deranged 21-year-old man while campaigning for the Democratic presidential nomination in Laurel, Md.

2006 A defiant Saddam Hussein refused to enter a plea at his trial, insisting he was still Iraq's president as a judge formally charged him with crimes against humanity.

To see more information on events taking place on May 15, click here.

Posted by d-nadler at 01:08 PM | Comments (0)

May 17, 2007

Answers to the Movie Trivia

Here are the answers:

When I'm good, I'm very, very good, but when I'm bad, I'm better.
I'm No Angel, spoken by Mae West

GERRY (Jack Lemmon): We can't get married at all…I'm a man.
OSGOOD (Joe E. Brown): Well, nobody's perfect.
Some like it hot

Oh no, it wasn't the aeroplanes. It was Beauty killed the Beast.
King Kong

The video is available at GSU:
Title: King Kong [videorecording] / RKO Radio Pictures, inc. ; produced and directed by Merian C. Cooper, Ernest B. Schoedsack ; writers, James Creelman, Ruth Rose.
Call Number: FLM-VDO. PN1997 .K56XVIDEORECORD759

It's okay, I wouldn't remember me either.
American Beauty, spoken by Kevin Spacey

That's 30 minutes away. I'll be there in 10.
Pulp Fiction, spoken by Harvey Kietel

Pulp Fiction is in the GSU Collection:
Pulp fiction [videorecording] / Miramax Films presents a Band Apart and Jersey Films production ; stories by Quentin Tarantino & Roger Avary ; produced by Lawrence Bender ; a film by Quentin Tarantino.
Call Number: VIDEO. PN1995.9.F54 P842002

I could have made class. I could have been a contender.
On the Waterfront, spoken by Marlon Brando

GSU owns two copies of On the Waterfront:
On the waterfront [videorecording] / Columbia Pictures Corporation.
Call Number: FLM-VDO. PN1997 .O457XVIDEORECORD710

On the waterfront [videorecording] / Columbia Pictures Corporation ; screenplay by Budd Schulberg ; produced by Sam Spiegel ; directed by Elia Kazan.
Call Number: VIDEO. PN1997 .O5422001

Sharpness is a state of mind.
Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, spoken by Yun-Fat Chow

JOE GILLIS: You used to be in pictures. You used to be big.
NORMA DESMOND: I am big. It's the pictures that got small.
Sunset Boulevard

If she can stand it, I can. Play it!
(usually misquoted as 'Play it again, Sam')
Casablanca, spoken by Humphrey Bogart

GSU owns two copies:
Casablanca [videorecording] / a Warner Bros Pictures ; a Hal B. Wallis production ; directed by Michael Curtiz ; screenplay by Julius J. & Philip G. Epstein and Howard Koch.
Call Number: VIDEO. PN1995.9.W3 C371999

Casablanca [videorecording] / Warner Brothers Pictures presents a Hal B. Wallis production ; directed by Michael Curtiz ; screenplay by Julius J. and Philip G. Epstein and Howard Koch.
Call Number: VIDEO. PN1995.9.F54 C352 1999

Why, a four-year-old child could understand this report. Run out and find me a four-year-old child. I can't make head or tail of it.
Duck Soup, spoken by Groucho Marx

I love the smell of napalm in the morning. It smells like victory.
Apocalypse Now, spoken by Robert Duvall

Ma, I made it…Top of the world!
White Heat, spoken by James Cagney

Posted by d-nadler at 02:27 PM | Comments (0)

May 14, 2007

Next Meeting: Friends of the GSU Library

Mark your calendar, the next meeting will be held:

Wednesday, May 16th
6 p.m. - 8 p.m.
D2417 - Library

Everyone is welcome to attend. For more information on the Friends of the GSU Library, click here.

Posted by d-nadler at 05:45 PM | Comments (0)

Mystery Book Discussion Group

Book Discussion: Maisie Dobbs (New York: Soho Press, 2003)
(This book discussion is part of the Changing the Face of Medicine exhibit.)

Tuesday May 15
Noon to 1 pm
Cafeteria Annex - Everyone is welcome. Bring your lunch and join in the discussion.

Awarded "Notable Book of the Year by the New York Times in 2003, Jacqueline Winspear's Maisie Dobbs introduces a series of successful mystery books. The protagonist, Maisie, served as a battlefield nurse in World War I. This narrative describes some of the hardships, both physical and emotional, endured by nurses during the war.

Moderators: Diane Dates Casey, Dean, University Library and Dr. Becky Nugent, Writing Center Coordinator.

Sponsor: The Friends of the University Library

Posted by d-nadler at 05:32 PM | Comments (0)

Today in History: May 14th

From Those Were the Days - Today in History:

1607 - Three very small ships, Susan Constant, Godspeed and Discovery, sailed across the ocean blue from Plymouth, England to a place the ship’s crew and passengers called Jamestown on this day in 1607.

This hearty group of Virginia Company settlers was chartered by England’s King James I, therefore, the name, Jamestown, Virginia. The group was led by Captain John Smith of Pocahontas fame and Christopher Newport.

Jamestown was the first permanent English settlement in what is now the United States. It became the capital of Virginia and remained so through 1699.

1874 - McGill University (of Canada) and Harvard University met on Jarvis Field, Cambridge, MA for the the first game of intercollegiate football in America.

1904 - The Olympic Games opened in St. Louis, MO. It marked the first time that the games were held in the United States.

1971 - The Honey Cone received a gold record for the single, Want Ads. The female soul trio was formed in Los Angeles in 1969 and scored two million-sellers, Want Ads and Stick Up. The trio had a total of four songs on the charts that were moderate hits. Only Want Ads, however, made it to the number one position.

Posted by d-nadler at 05:24 PM | Comments (0)

Today in History: May 11th

From Those Were the Days - Today in History:

1858 - Minnesota entered the United States of America this day as the Union’s 32nd state. Although its state bird is the common loon, there’s nothing common about Minnesota, whose Dakota-Sioux Indian name means sky-tinted water. The North Star State’s capital is St. Paul, which has a twin city, Minneapolis. The state flower is the lovely lady’s slipper.

1946 - B.F. Goodrich announced the development of the tubeless tire. If you guessed that Mr. Goodrich was from Akron, OH, you win the T-shirt.

1972 - The San Francisco Giants announced that they were trading Willie Mays to the New York Mets.

1985 - Scott Brayton turned in the fastest lap ever at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Brayton was traveling at 214.199 MPH in the third lap of qualifying. He had already set records in the first two trips around the track. Brayton’s average speed of 212.354 broke the record previously set by Tom Sneva in the 1984 time trials.

Posted by d-nadler at 05:19 PM | Comments (0)

May 10, 2007

From Rich Township to Billboard Icon: Celebrating the Achievements of Sharon Harris-Ingram, M.D.

Friday May 11
1 - 3 PM
Room D34115

Dr. Sharon Harris-Ingram grew up in Park Forest, Illinois, and is a graduate of Rich East High School where she was active in sports. She has transitioned from playing basketball to practicing Obstetrics and Gynecology on a medical team with the OSF Medical Group in Pontiac, Illinois. What do kids need to know about college if they want to consider a medical career? What are the opportunities for minorities in medicine, especially women and ethnic minorities? Dr. Ingram will address these questions and share her path to a life in medicine in a small rural community in central Illinois.

Presenter: Dr. Sharon Harris-Ingram, OSF St. James Hospital and OSF Medical Group, Pontiac, Illinois.

This program is part of the Changing the Face of Medicine.

Posted by d-nadler at 04:04 PM | Comments (0)

Today in History: May 10th

From This Day in History: History.com

1869 : First transcontinental railroad is completed
At Promontory, Utah, California Governor Leland Stanford pounds in a ceremonial golden spike that completes the nation's first transcontinental railway. After failing to hit the spike on his first attempt, Stanford raised the heavy sledgehammer again and struck a solid square blow. For the first time in American history, railways linked together east and west, the realization of a dream that began two decades earlier.
Finish reading the article.
Watch video clip.

Read books about the Transcontinental Railroad:
Author: Williams, John Hoyt.
Title: A great and shining road : the epic story of the transcontinental railroad / by John Hoyt Williams.
Call Number: HE27631988

Author: Blumberg, Rhoda.
Title: Full steam ahead : the race to build a transcontinental railroad / by Rhoda Blumberg.
Call Number: MAT-CTR. HE2791.U55 B581996

Find more books in the GSU Library.

1940 : Churchill becomes prime minister
Winston Churchill, First Lord of the Admiralty, is called to replace Neville Chamberlain as British prime minister following the latter's resignation after losing a confidence vote in the House of Commons.
Finish reading the article.

Read books about Winston Churchill:
Author: Best, Geoffrey Francis Andrew.
Title: Churchill : a study in greatness / Geoffrey Best.
Call Number: DA566.9.C5 B482001

Author: Berthon, Simon.
Title: Allies at war : the bitter rivalry among Churchill, Roosevelt, and de Gaulle / Simon Berthon
Call Number: D748 .B472001b


1990 : China releases Tiananmen Square prisoners
The government of the People's Republic of China announces that it is releasing 211 people arrested during the massive protests held in Tiananmen Square in Beijing in June 1989. Most observers viewed the prisoner release as an attempt by the communist government of China to dispel much of the terrible publicity it received for its brutal suppression of the 1989 protests.
Finish reading the article.

Read about Tiananmen Square:
Author: Calhoun, Craig J., 1952-
Title: Neither gods nor emperors : students and the struggle for democracy in China
Call Number: DS779.32 .C351994

Author: Mu, I.
Title: Crisis at Tiananmen : reform and reality in modern China
Call Number: DS779.32.M84 X1989

Find more books at GSU.

1994 : Nelson Mandela inaugurated
In South Africa, Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela is sworn in as the first black president of South Africa. In his inaugural address, Mandela, who spent 27 years of his life as a political prisoner of the South African government, declared that "the time for the healing of the wounds has come." Two weeks earlier, more than 22 million South Africans had turned out to cast ballots in the country's first-ever multiracial parliamentary elections. An overwhelming majority chose Mandela and his African National Congress (ANC) party to lead the country.
Finish reading the article.

Read books about Nelson Mandela:
Author: Sampson, Anthony.
Title: Mandela : the authorized biography
Call Number: DT1974 .S26 1999

Author: Meer, Fatima.
Title: Higher than hope : the authorized biography of Nelson Mandela
Call Number: DT1949.M35 M441990

Find more books at GSU.

Posted by d-nadler at 02:02 PM | Comments (0)

May 09, 2007

Lines from Movies

Can you identify the movie and in some instances the actor/actress that said the line?

1. When I'm good, I'm very, very good, but when I'm bad, I'm better.

2.GERRY (Jack Lemmon): We can't get married at all…I'm a man.
OSGOOD (Joe E. Brown): Well, nobody's perfect.

3. Oh no, it wasn't the aeroplanes. It was Beauty killed the Beast.

4. It's okay, I wouldn't remember me either.

5. That's 30 minutes away. I'll be there in 10.

6. I could have made class. I could have been a contender.

7. Sharpness is a state of mind.

8. JOE GILLIS: You used to be in pictures. You used to be big.
NORMA DESMOND: I am big. It's the pictures that got small.

9. (Correction) If she can stand it, I can. Play it!

10. Why, a four-year-old child could understand this report. Run out and find me a four-year-old child. I can't make head or tail of it.

11. I love the smell of napalm in the morning. It smells like victory.

12. Ma, I made it…Top of the world!

Posted by d-nadler at 02:15 PM | Comments (1)

Today in History: May 9th

From This Day in History: History.com

1914 : Woodrow Wilson proclaims the first Mother’s Day holiday
On this day in 1914, President Woodrow Wilson issues a presidential proclamation that officially establishes the first national Mother’s Day holiday to celebrate America’s mothers.
Finish reading about the history of Mother's Day.

1960 : FDA approves the pill
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves the world's first commercially produced birth-control bill--Enovid-10, made by the G.D. Searle Company of Chicago, Illinois.
Finish reading the article.

1971 : Last Honeymooners episode
On this day in 1971, the last episode of The Honeymooners airs.
Finish reading the article.

2001 : Soccer fans trampled in Ghana
On this day in 2001, during a soccer match at Accra Stadium in Ghana, an encounter between police and rowdy fans results in a stampede that kills 126 people. This tragedy was the worst-ever sports-related disaster in Africa’s history to that time.
Finish reading the article.

Posted by d-nadler at 01:55 PM | Comments (0)

Answers to the Famous First Lines

1. It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair.

Charles Dickens - A Tale of Two Cities - 1859
Read the book: PR4571 .B66

2. If you really want to hear about it, the first thing you'll probably want to know is where I was born, and what my lousy childhood was like, and how my parents were occupied and all before they had me, and all that David Copperfield kind of crap, but I don't feel like going into it, if you want to know the truth.

J. D. Salinger - Catcher in the Rye - 1951
Read the book: PS3537.A426 C351964

3. Stately, plump Buck Mulligan came from the stairhead, bearing a bowl of lather on which a mirror and a razor lay crossed.

James Joyce - Ulysses - 1922
Read the book: PR6019.O9 U41946

4. Through the fence, between the curling flower spaces, I could see them hitting.

William Faulkner - The Sound and the Fury - 1929
Read the book: PS3511.A86 S67

5. 124 was spiteful.

Toni Morrison - Beloved - 1987
Read the book: PS3563.O8749 B4 2004

6. I am a sick man . . . I am a spiteful man.

Fyodor Dostoyevsky (trans. Michael R. Katz) - Notes from Underground - 1864

7. All this happened, more or less.

Kurt Vonnegut - Slaughterhouse-Five - 1969

8. Ships at a distance have every man's wish on board.

Zora Neale Hurston -Their Eyes Were Watching God - 1937
Read the book: PS3515.U789 T6391991

9. It was a pleasure to burn.

Ray Bradbury - Fahrenheit 451 - 1953

10. The towers of Zenith aspired above the morning mist; austere towers of steel and cement and limestone, sturdy as cliffs and delicate as silver rods.

Sinclair Lewis - Babbitt - 1922
Read the book: PS3523.E94 B3

Posted by d-nadler at 01:19 PM | Comments (0)

May 08, 2007

Today in History: May 8th

From This day in History: History.com

1884 : Harry S. Truman is born

On this day in 1884, Harry S. Truman is born in Lamar, Missouri. The son of a farmer, Truman could not afford to go to college. He joined the army at the relatively advanced age of 33 in 1916 to fight in World War I. After the war, he opened a haberdashery in Kansas City. When that business went bankrupt in 1922, he entered Missouri politics. Truman went on to serve in the U.S. Senate from 1934 until he was chosen as Franklin D. Roosevelt’s fourth vice president in 1945; it was during his Senate terms that he developed a reputation for honesty and integrity. Finish reading the article.

Read about Harry S. Truman:
Truman and Korea : the political culture of the early cold war / Paul G. Pierpaoli, Jr.
DS919 .P541999

The decision to drop the atomic bomb / Dennis D. Wainstock
D769.1 .W351996

Check the GSU Library Catalog for more books.

1945 : Victory in Europe

On this day in 1945, both Great Britain and the United States celebrate Victory in Europe Day. Cities in both nations, as well as formerly occupied cities in Western Europe, put out flags and banners, rejoicing in the defeat of the Nazi war machine.

Click here to finish reading the article.
Watch a video clip on V-E Day.

Posted by d-nadler at 02:19 PM | Comments (0)

From Rich Township to Billboard Icon: Celebrating the Achievements of Sharon Harris-Ingram, M.D.

Friday May 11
1 - 3 PM
Room D34115

Dr. Sharon Harris-Ingram grew up in Park Forest, Illinois, and is a graduate of Rich East High School where she was active in sports. She has transitioned from playing basketball to practicing Obstetrics and Gynecology on a medical team with the OSF Medical Group in Pontiac, Illinois. What do kids need to know about college if they want to consider a medical career? What are the opportunities for minorities in medicine, especially women and ethnic minorities? Dr. Ingram will address these questions and share her path to a life in medicine in a small rural community in central Illinois.

Presenter: Dr. Sharon Harris-Ingram, OSF St. James Hospital and OSF Medical Group, Pontiac, Illinois.

This is a part of the Changing the Face of Medicine: Celebrating America’s Women Physicians. To see more events, click here.

Posted by d-nadler at 02:09 PM | Comments (0)

May 07, 2007

Book Discussion

Having Our Say: The Delany Sisters' First 100 Years (New York: Kodansha, 1993)

Tuesday, May 8
1-2 PM
Room D2417 (University Library Administrative Conference Room)
Please call Sarah 708-235-7518 to register

Having Our Say is the award-winning story of centenarian sisters Sadie and Bessie Delany. Sadie was New York City's first black high school home economics teacher, and Bessie was the second black woman licensed to practice dentistry in New York. Join in this discussion of the achievements of these remarkable women.

Moderator: Sarah Wegley, Senior Library Specialist, University Library.

Posted by d-nadler at 03:23 PM | Comments (0)

Today in History: May 7th

The information was found at:
Those Were the Days - Today in History and This Day in History: History.com

1789 - The first Presidential Inaugural Ball was held in New York City. Each lady in attendance received as a gift a portrait of George Washington. Actually, the ball was the first such event held for the incoming President of the United States.
1915 : German submarine sinks Lusitania The earlier German attacks on merchant ships off the south coast of Ireland prompted the British Admiralty to warn the Lusitania to avoid the area or take simple evasive action, such as zigzagging to confuse U-boats plotting the vessel's course. The captain of the Lusitania ignored these recommendations, and at 2:12 p.m. on May 7, in the waters of the Celtic Sea, the 32,000-ton ship was hit by an exploding torpedo on its starboard side. The torpedo blast was followed by a larger explosion, probably of the ship's boilers. The Lusitania sank within 20 minutes.
Continue reading about the sinking of the Lusitania...

View a video clip.

Read about World War I:
The First World War / Gerard J. De Groot.
D521 .D352000

The First World War / Hew Strachan.
D521 .S862001

Search the Library Catalog for more books.

1959 - It was one of the most touching and memorable nights in all of baseball on this night. 93,103 fans packed the LA Coliseum for an exhibition game between the Los Angeles Dodgers and the New York Yankees. Sandy Koufax pitched for the Dodgers and lost to the Yankees, 6-2. It was Roy Campanella Night. The star catcher for the Dodgers, paralyzed in an automobile accident, was honored for his contributions to the team for many years. ‘Campie’ continued to serve in various capacities with the Dodger organization for many years.


Read about Roy Campanella:
Roy Campanella, man of courage.
MAT-CTR. GV865.C3 S37

Posted by d-nadler at 02:25 PM | Comments (0)

May 04, 2007

Famous First Lines of Novels

Below is a list 1st lines from 10 novels. Who is the author and what is the name of the novel?

1. It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair.

2. If you really want to hear about it, the first thing you'll probably want to know is where I was born, and what my lousy childhood was like, and how my parents were occupied and all before they had me, and all that David Copperfield kind of crap, but I don't feel like going into it, if you want to know the truth.

3. Stately, plump Buck Mulligan came from the stairhead, bearing a bowl of lather on which a mirror and a razor lay crossed.

4. Through the fence, between the curling flower spaces, I could see them hitting.

5. 124 was spiteful.

6. I am a sick man . . . I am a spiteful man.

7. All this happened, more or less.

8. Ships at a distance have every man's wish on board.

9. It was a pleasure to burn.

10. The towers of Zenith aspired above the morning mist; austere towers of steel and cement and limestone, sturdy as cliffs and delicate as silver rods.

Posted by d-nadler at 03:39 PM | Comments (0)

Homeland Security Digital Library (HSDL)

Governors State University Library now subscribes to the Homeland Security Digital Library. Every two weeks, the Homeland Security Digital Library identifies "Critical Releases in Homeland Security," a targeted collection of recently-released documents that are expected to influence homeland security policy & strategy development.

This weeks releases are:
National Strategy for Aviation Security
United States. White House Office

Nuclear Energy; Balancing Benefits and Risks
Council on Foreign Relations

United States Intelligence Community (IC) 100 Day Plan for Integration and Collaboration
United States. Office of the Director of National Intelligence

Task Force on Returning Global War on Terror Heroes
United States. Department of Veterans Affairs. Task Force on Returning Global War on Terror Heroes

Country Reports on Terrorism 2006
United States. Dept. of State

National Security and the Threat of Climate Change
CNA Corporation

To search this or any other database GSU subscribes to, click here.

Posted by d-nadler at 12:09 PM | Comments (0)

Today in History: May 4th

From This Day in History: History.com

1886 : The Haymarket Square Riot
At Haymarket Square in Chicago, Illinois, a bomb is thrown at a squad of policemen attempting to break up a labor rally. The police responded with wild gunfire, killing several people in the crowd and injuring dozens more. Read more...

Books at GSU:
Beyond the martyrs : a social history of Chicago’s anarchists, 1870-1900 / Bruce C. Nelson
HX846.C4 N451988

The Haymarket tragedy / Paul Avrich.
HX846.C4 A971984

The Accused and the accusers; the famous speeches of the eight Chicago anarchists in court. With an introd. by Leon Stein and Philip Taft.
HX486.C4 A361970

1970: National Guard Kill 4 at Kent State
In Kent, Ohio, 28 National Guardsmen fire their weapons...
Read more...

Books at GSU:
May 1970 : the campus aftermath of Cambodia and Kent State / by Richard E. Peterson and John A. Bilorusky.
LA186 .P4X

The report of the President’s Commission on Campus Unrest.
DOCS. PR37.8:C15/R29

1990 : An inhumane execution
Jesse Tafero is executed in Florida after his electric chair malfunctions three times, causing flames to leap from his head. Tafero's death sparked a new debate on humane methods of execution. Several states ceased use of the electric chair and adopted lethal injection as their means of capital punishment. Read more...

Books at GSU:
The death penalty : beyond the smoke and mirrors / Alfred B. Heilbrun
HV8699.U5 H452006

Death watch : a death penalty anthology / Lane Nelson, Burk Foster
HV8699.U5 N45 2001

Dead man walking : an eyewitness account of the death penalty in the United States / Helen Prejean
HV8699.U5 P741993

Posted by d-nadler at 11:23 AM | Comments (0)

Today in History: May 3

From This Day in History: History.com

1863 : Confederates take Hazel Grove at Chancellorsville
On this day, General Joseph Hooker and the Army of the Potomac abandon a key hill on the Chancellorsville battlefield. The Union army was reeling after Stonewall Jackson's troops swung around the Union right flank and stormed out of the woods on the evening of May 2, causing the Federals to retreat some two miles before stopping the Confederate advance. Read more...

1937 : Gone With the Wind wins Pulitzer Prize
On this day in 1937, Margaret Mitchell's novel, Gone With the Wind, wins the Pulitzer Prize. The book, published in June 1936, became one of the best-selling novels of all time. The motion picture, made in 1939, became one of the most profitable films in history. Read more...

1952 : Fletcher lands on the North Pole
A ski-modified U.S. Air Force C-47 piloted by Lieutenant Colonel Joseph O. Fletcher of Oklahoma and Lieutenant Colonel William P. Benedict of California becomes the first aircraft to land on the North Pole. A moment later, Fletcher climbed out of the plane and walked to the exact geographic North Pole, probably the first person in history to do so. Read more...

Posted by d-nadler at 11:12 AM | Comments (0)

Today in History: May 2

From Those Were the Days - Today in History:

1885 - A new magazine for homemakers went on sale this day. You can still get it by mail or find it right next to the cash register at your favorite grocery store. The magazine is "Good Housekeeping". It has our seal of approval.
1939 - Lou Gehrig established a new major-league baseball record as he played in his 2,130th game. ‘The Iron Horse’ had played in every Yankee game since June 1, 1925. (It would be 57 years until Cal Ripken, Jr. of the Baltimore Orioles would shatter that record in the summer of 1995.)
1974 - Filming got underway for the motion picture, "Jaws", in Martha’s Vineyard, MA. What was to be a 58-day shooting schedule for the film inspired by the Peter Benchley novel soon gave way to 120 days. Costs soared from what was to be a $3.5 million project to $8 million. The director, Steven Spielberg, was able to explain away the rise in costs and the picture did very well at the box office and, later, on video cassette.

Posted by d-nadler at 10:58 AM | Comments (0)

May 01, 2007

Today in History: May 1

From Those Were the Days - Today in History:

1885 - The first skyscraper in America was under construction. No, it wasn’t in New York. It was a 10-story building located on the corner of LaSalle and Adams in Chicago, IL.

Read about Chicago Architecture:

Chicago architecture and design / Jay Pridmore, George A. Larson ; with principal photography by Hedrich Blessing.
NA735.C4 L372005

Architecture in Chicago & mid-America; a photographic history.
NA735.C4 A65

Chicago’s famous buildings; a photographic guide to the city’s architectural landmarks and other notable buildings. Edited by Arthur Siegel. Descriptive text by J. Carson Webster. With contributions by Carl W. Condit, Hugh Dalziel Duncan [and] Wilbert R. Hasbrouck.
NA735.C4 S51969

1920 - The longest baseball game (by innings) was played. The Boston Braves and the Brooklyn Dodgers played an incredible 26 innings -- with the same pitchers! Leon Cadore of Brooklyn and Boston’s Joe Oeschger went the distance and saw the game end in a 1-1 tie. Rumors that the groundskeeper had to roll up the poor pitchers’ arms after play was stopped are probably not far off...
1960 - An American U-2 plane invaded Soviet airspace. The Soviets reacted by shooting down the plane piloted by the C.I.A.’s Francis Gary Powers. It took five days for the Soviets to announce the occurrance to the rest of the world. At first the U.S. referred to the U-2 as a weather reconnaissance plane, denying that Powers was a spy. Later, the U.S. State Department admitted that the mission was to photograph Soviet military installations, and that the mission was justified. Powers was tried as a spy by the Soviet Union. He was sentenced to solitary confinement for 10 years in "Matrosskaya Tishina". In 17 months, he was exchanged for Russian spy Rudolf Abel who had been exposed by the CIA.

Read about Francis Gary Powers:

The U-2 incident, May, 1960: an American spy plane downed over Russia intensifies the cold war, by Fred J. Cook.
MAT-CTR. DK266.3 .C66

Posted by d-nadler at 03:43 PM | Comments (0)

Changing the Face of Medicine: Upcoming Events

Thursday, May 3
11 AM - 12:30 PM
Room D2401B (University Library) Seating is limited for this hands-on computer based workshop. Please pre-register by calling Lydia Morrow-Ruetten at 708-534-4116.

Exploring the Library of Congress Primary Source Materials for Women Physicians

Familiarize yourself with Library of Congress primary source materials by exploring the Library of Congress's Adventure of the American Mind at this informative hands-on workshop. Participants will learn how to locate digitized primary source materials and use them to enrich teaching, research, and scholarship activity, as well as for personal interest.

Presenter: Lydia Morrow Ruetten

Sunday May 6
2-4 PM
University Library

Hen Medics: Early Women Physicians in War

This presentation includes enlightening and revealing information on the role of women in American wars and the gender battles they fought to gain recognition and standing. Dr. Graf's presentation is based on her extensive research and publications on the subject, including her latest book, On the Field of Mercy: Women Medical Volunteers in the Civil War to World War I (New York: Humanities Books, 2007) Dr. Graf is the author of AWoman of Honor: Dr. Mary E. Walker, And the Civil War (Gettysburg, PA: Thomas, 2001). Dr. Walker served the Union Army as a contract surgeon during the Civil War and is the only woman and civilian to be awarded the Medal of Honor, which she wore proudly until her death in 1919. Dr. Walker was captured by the Rebellion and served time in a Confederate prison, charged with spying for the Union. She was released in a prisoner exchange for another man.

Presenter: Mercedes Graf, Ph.D., independent scholar, author, consultant, and former professor of psychology at Governors State University.

Reception and Book Signing of A Woman of Honor

A reception and book signing will follow the presentation. Copies of A Woman of Honor will be available for purchase directly from the author, and are also available for borrowing from the University Library.

Posted by d-nadler at 03:30 PM | Comments (0)

Phobias - Answers

Answers to Phobias:

13, number- Triskadekaphobia

666, number- Hexakosioihexekontahexaphobia

Animals- Zoophobia

Ants- Myrmecophobia

Atomic Explosions- Atomosophobia

Bald people- Peladophobia

Cemeteries or being buried alive- Taphephobia or Taphophobia

Chopsticks- Consecotaleophobia

Color yellow- Xanthophobia

Color white- Leukophobia

Dolls- Pediophobia

Eyes- Ommetaphobia or Ommatophobia

Eyes, opening one's- Optophobia

Fish- Ichthyophobia

Food- Cibophobia

Forests- Hylophobia

Ghosts- Phasmophobia

Halloween- Samhainophobia

Hospitals- Nosocomephobia

Knees- Genuphobia

Mirrors- Catoptrophobia

Music- Melophobia

Peanut butter sticking to the roof of the mouth- Arachibutyrophobia

Puppets- Pupaphobia

Yellow color- Xanthophobia

Posted by d-nadler at 03:29 PM | Comments (0)