December 15, 2010

Semester Break Hours

Semester Break Hours

Monday, December 13th - Friday, December, 17th: 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Saturday, December 18th - Sunday, December 19th: Closed
Monday, December 20th - Thursday, December 23rd: 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Friday, December 24th to Monday, January 3rd: Closed

Posted by d-nadler at 01:44 PM | Comments (0)

November 22, 2010

Thanksgiving Holiday Hours

The GSU Library will close at 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, November 24th and remain closed through Sunday, November 28th for the Thanksgiving holiday. The library will reopen Monday morning at its regular time (8:00 a.m.).

Posted by d-nadler at 03:54 PM | Comments (0)

August 31, 2010

Closed Labor Day Weekend

The Library will be closed Saturday, September 4th - Monday, September 6th, 2010 for Labor Day weekend.

Posted by d-nadler at 03:55 PM | Comments (0)

May 25, 2010

Memorial Day Weekend

The GSU Library will be closed Saturday, May 29 — Monday, May 31, 2010 for Memorial Day. The library will resume regular hours on Tuesday, June 1st. To see the library hours and closings visit the Library Calendar or the Library Hours webpage.

Posted by d-nadler at 03:46 PM | Comments (0)

April 09, 2009

Memorial Day Weekend

The Governors State University Library will be closed from Saturday, May 21st, 2009 through Monday, May 25th, 2009. The Library will reopen Tuesday, May 26th at 8:00 a.m.

Posted by d-nadler at 04:40 PM | Comments (0)

August 25, 2008

Library Closed Labor Day

The GSU Library will be closed Monday, September 1st for Labor Day. The GSU Library will reopen Tuesday, September 2nd at 8:00 a.m. and close at 10:30 p.m.

Posted by d-nadler at 12:21 PM | Comments (0)

July 01, 2008

4th of July Holiday Hours

The GSU Library will be closing at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, July 3rd, 2008. The Library will reopen Saturday, July 5th at 8:30 a.m. For more information, visit the library website at: http://www.govst.edu/library/
or call the Reference Desk at 708-534-4111.

Posted by d-nadler at 04:38 PM | Comments (0)

May 19, 2008

Change of Hours for Memorial Day Weekend

The GSU Libray will have a change in hours for Memorial Day Weekend. The hours will be:

Saturday, May 24th - Monday, May 26th: CLOSED

We will resume normal hours on Tuesday, May 27th.

Posted by d-nadler at 11:19 AM | Comments (0)

May 05, 2008

Happy Cinco de Mayo!!!!

Did you know that Cinco de Mayo celebrations are not celebrating Mexico's Independence Day?

Cinco de Mayo acutally:

Commemorates the victory of the Mexican militia over the French army at The Battle Of Puebla in 1862. From: MEXonline.com

History of Cinco de Mayo:

During the French-Mexican War, a poorly supplied and outnumbered Mexican army under General Ignacio Zaragoza defeats a French army attempting to capture Puebla de Los Angeles, a small town in east-central Mexico. Victory at the Battle of Puebla represented a great moral victory for the Mexican government, symbolizing the country's ability to defend its sovereignty against threat by a powerful foreign nation.

In 1861, the liberal Mexican Benito Juarez became president of a country in financial ruin, and he was forced to default on his debts to European governments. In response, France, Britain, and Spain sent naval forces to Veracruz to demand reimbursement. Britain and Spain negotiated with Mexico and withdrew, but France, ruled by Napoleon III, decided to use the opportunity to carve a dependent empire out of Mexican territory. Late in 1861, a well-armed French fleet stormed Veracruz, landing a large French force and driving President Juarez and his government into retreat. To finish reading the history of Cinco de Mayo go to: http://www.history.com/minisite.do?content_type=Minisite_Generic&content_type_id=767&display_order=4&mini_id=1099

For more information on Cinco de Mayo:

Mexonline.com Cinco de Mayo History and Celebration, Mexican Holidays

What Do Mexicans Celebrate on Cinco de Mayo (May 5th)?

Cinco de Mayo - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Posted by d-nadler at 11:04 AM | Comments (0)

March 20, 2008

Easter Sunday

The Governors State University Library will be closed Sunday, March 23rd.

Posted by d-nadler at 01:15 PM | Comments (0)

February 11, 2008

Lincoln's Birthday

The GSU Library will be closed Tuesday, February 12th for Lincoln's Birthday.

Posted by d-nadler at 04:09 PM | Comments (0)

January 15, 2008

Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday

The Governors State University Library will be closed Saturday, January 19th, 2008 - Monday, January 21st, 2008. We will reopen Tuesday, January 22nd at 8:30 a.m.

Posted by d-nadler at 04:47 PM | Comments (1)

July 03, 2007

HAPPY 4TH OF JULY

The following information is from the US Census Press Releases. Did you know that:

In July 1776, the estimated number of people living in the newly independent nation was 2.5 million.
(1776 population from Historical Statistics of the United States: Colonial Times to 1970.)

The nation’s population on this July Fourth will be 302 million.

View image of fireworks.
Free photo from bigfoto.com

$206.3 million is the value of fireworks imported from China in 2006, representing the bulk of all U.S. fireworks imported ($216 million). U.S. exports of fireworks, by comparison, came to just $22.6 million in 2006, with Japan purchasing more than any other country ($8 million). <http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/www/>

View image of fireworks.
Free photo from bigfoto.com


In 2006, $5.3 million was the dollar value of U.S. imports of American flags; the vast majority of this amount ($5 million) was for U.S. flags made in China. <http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/www/>

That there are 30 places nationwide with “liberty” in its name. The most populous one is Liberty, Mo. (29,042). Iowa, with four, has more of these places than any other state: Libertyville, New Liberty, North Liberty and West Liberty.

Thirty-two places are named “eagle” — after the majestic bird that serves as our national symbol. (Places include cities, towns, villages and census-designated places.) The most populous such place is Eagle Pass, Texas, with 25,571 residents. There is also Eagle County, Colo., with a population of 49,085.

Eleven places have “independence” in their name. The most populous of these is Independence, Mo., with 110,208 residents.
Five places adopted the name “freedom.” Freedom, Calif., with 6,000 residents, has the largest population among these.

Sources: <http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/population/007001.html>,
<http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/population/009756.html>, and American FactFinder)

Posted by d-nadler at 06:12 PM | Comments (0)

May 25, 2007

GSU Library Closed Memorial Day Weekend

The Governors State University Library will be closed:

Saturday, May 26th - Monday, May 28th. Regular hours will resume Tuesday, May 29th.

Click here to see the Library Hours.

Click here to go to the Library Calendar.

Posted by d-nadler at 11:43 AM | Comments (0)

May 22, 2007

Memorial Day

The Governors State University Library will be closed:

Saturday, May 26th - Monday, May 28th. Regular hours will resume Tuesday, May 29th.

Click here to see the Library Hours.

Click here to go to the Library Calendar.

Posted by d-nadler at 03:40 PM | Comments (0)

February 08, 2007

Lincoln's Birthday

Governors State University Library will be closed Monday, February 12th, 2007 for Lincoln's Birthday.

Posted by d-nadler at 04:10 PM | Comments (0)

December 21, 2006

Holiday Closing

Governors State University Library will be closed from Friday, December 22nd, 2006 - Monday, January 1st, 2007. We hope everyone has a safe and happy holiday. We look forward to seeing everyone in the new year.

Posted by d-nadler at 02:20 PM | Comments (0)

December 19, 2006

The Christmas Story from The Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Christmas Story in works of art at The Metropolitan Museum of Art

To See The Christmas Story in Art, click here.

To Hear the Story, click here.

To Read the Story, click here.

To send an E-Card, click here.

Click here to go to The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Posted by d-nadler at 03:43 PM | Comments (0)

Hanukkah

From the Jewish Outreach Institute:

Hanukkah is the most widely celebrated American Jewish holiday, possibly because it is a fun, child-centered occasion. It is celebrated with excellent food, exchanging gifts, and lighting beautiful menorahs (special Hanukkah candelabras) filled with brightly colored candles. Unlike some of the other Jewish holidays, which require intense spiritual reflection or elaborate preparation, it is easy to celebrate.
Many Jewish holidays commemorate events invested with historical and religious meaning, and Hanukkah is no exception. Hanukkah means "rededication," and it commemorates the rededication of the Temple in Jerusalem after its desecration by foreign forces. The celebration also reaffirms thecontinuing struggle to live by God's commandments and to lead Jewish lives.

To learn more about Hanukkah, click here.

Posted by d-nadler at 03:39 PM | Comments (0)

Kwanzaa

The Official Kwanzaa Web Site

Kwanzaa a Celebration of Family Community and Culture
December 26th - January 1st

Here is just one of the many things you will learn about:

Kwanzaa: Roots and Branches

The Continental African Roots Kwanzaa is an African American and Pan-African holiday which celebrates family, community and culture. Celebrated from 26 December thru 1 January, its origins are in the first harvest celebrations of Africa from which it takes its name. The name Kwanzaa is derived from the phrase "matunda ya kwanza" which means "first fruits" in Swahili, a Pan-African language which is the most widely spoken African language.
The first-fruits celebrations are recorded in African history as far back as ancient Egypt and Nubia and appear in ancient and modern times in other classical African civilizations such as Ashantiland and Yorubaland. These celebrations are also found in ancient and modern times among societies as large as empires (the Zulu or kingdoms (Swaziland) or smaller societies and groups like the Matabele, Thonga and Lovedu, all of southeastern Africa. Kwanzaa builds on the five fundamental activities of Continental African "first fruit" celebrations: ingathering; reverence; commemoration; recommitment; and celebration. Kwanzaa, then, is:

To finish reading, click here.

Posted by d-nadler at 02:20 PM | Comments (0)

December 14, 2006

Call Santa Claus

Thank you Sarah for passing along this information.
According to KGBT 4 - TV Harlinggan, TX
Call Santa Claus for Free
Dec 13, 2006 12:29 PM CST

Do your children want to hear from Santa Claus this holiday?
There's a new toll-free phone number available where they can call a listen to a daily message from 'Ole Saint Nick himself.
Call 1-800-972-6242. We called just to make sure Santa Claus would answer. :)

Click here to go to the website.

Posted by d-nadler at 04:03 PM | Comments (0)

November 12, 2006

The History of Verteran's Day

Go to http://www.army.mil/cmh-pg/faq/vetsday/vetshist.htm to learn the history of Veteran's Day.

Posted by d-nadler at 01:59 PM | Comments (0)

July 03, 2006

Looking for something to do on the 4th of July?

Why not check out the McCormick Freedom Museum?

July 4, 2006 10:00 AM-6:00 PM Independence Day Free-for-All
Location: Freedom Museum
General Admission: FREE ADMISSION ALL DAY Members: FREE
Tuesday, July 4, 2006 Free admission to the Freedom Museum all day!

Some of the exhibits are:

FOR WHICH IT STANDS

A new exhibition presented by the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History, explores the symbolism and meaning of our most prominent national symbol-the American flag. This special exhibit includes a portion of the original Star Spangled Banner-the flag that inspired the national anthem. The exhibit runs from 5/26 until 11/13 at the Freedom Museum.

WHAT DOES FREEDOM MEAN

Listen to voices from the past. Listen to voices from the present. In fact...you can listen to your own voice.
From celebrities to politicians to people just like you, this exhibit offers a wide array of personal opinion about freedom. A recording booth allows visitors to even add their voice and become a part of the exhibit.

For more information, click here.

Posted by d-nadler at 04:38 PM | Comments (0)

July 01, 2006

4th of July Facts

From the U.S. Census Press Releases
CB06-FF.09
May 17, 2006

The Fourth of July 2006

On this day in 1776, the Declaration of Independence was approved by the Continental Congress, starting the 13 colonies on the road to freedom as a sovereign nation. As always, this most American of holidays will be marked by parades, fireworks and backyard barbecues across the country.

2.5 million
In July 1776, the number of people living in the colonies. (1776 population from Historical Statistics of the United States: Colonial Times to 1970.)

300 million On this July 4th, the population milestone our nation soon will be closing in on.
Fourth of July Cookouts 150 million Number of hot dogs (all varieties) expected to be consumed by Americans on this holiday. (That’s one frankfurter for every two people.) There’s more than a 1-in-4 chance that the hot dogs made of pork originated in Iowa, as the Hawkeye State had a total inventory of 15.2 million market hogs and pigs on March 1, 2006. This represents more than one-fourth of the nation’s total. North Carolina (8.5 million) and Minnesota (5.8 million) were the runners-up. (Data on hot dog consumption courtesy of the National Hot Dog and Sausage Council.) Data on hogs and pigs at <http://www.nass.usda.gov>.
7.3 billion pounds Total production of cattle and calves in Texas in 2005. Chances are good that the beef hot dogs, steaks and burgers on your backyard grill came from the Lone Star State, which accounted for over one-sixth of the nation’s total production. And if they did not come from Texas, they very well may have come from Nebraska (4.5 billion pounds) or Kansas (4 billion pounds). <http://www.nass.usda.gov>
6 Number of states in which the revenue from broiler chickens was $1 billion or greater between December 2004 and November 2005. There is a good chance that one of these states — Georgia, Arkansas, Alabama, North Carolina, Mississippi or Texas — is the source of your barbecued chicken. <http://www.nass.usda.gov>
Better than 50-50 The odds that the beans in your side dish of baked beans came from North Dakota, Michigan or Nebraska, which produced 60 percent of the nation’s dry, edible beans in 2005. Another popular July 4th side dish is corn on the cob. Florida, California and Georgia together accounted for 51 percent of the sweet corn produced nationally in 2005. <http://www.nass.usda.gov>
Please Pass the Potato Salad Potato salad and potato chips are popular food items at July 4th barbecues. One-half of the nation’s spuds were produced in Idaho or Washington in 2005. <http://www.nass.usda.gov>
More than 68 million Number of Americans who said they have taken part in a barbecue during the previous year. It’s probably safe to assume a lot of these events took place on Independence Day. See Table 1230, 2006 edition: <http://www.census.gov/prod/www/statistical-abstract.html>
Fireworks $201.9 million The value of fireworks imported from China in 2005, representing the bulk of all U.S. fireworks imported ($211 million). U.S. exports of fireworks, by comparison, came to just $14.9 million in 2005, with Australia purchasing more than any other country ($4.4 million). <http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/www/>
$17.3 million The value of U.S. manufacturers’ shipments of fireworks in 2002. <http://www.census.gov/prod/ec02/ec0231i325998t.pdf>
Flags $5.5 million In 2005, the dollar value of U.S. imports of American flags; the vast majority of this amount ($5 million) was for U.S. flags made in China. <http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/www/>
$993,000 Dollar value of U.S. flags exported in 2005. Mexico was the leading customer, purchasing $529,000 worth. <http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/www/>
$349 million Annual dollar value of shipments of fabricated flags, banners and similar emblems by the nation’s manufacturers, according to the latest published Economic Census (2002) data. <http://www.census.gov/prod/ec02/ec0231i314999t.pdf>
Patriotic-Sounding Names 30 Number of places nationwide with “liberty” in its name. The most populous one is Liberty, Mo. (28,528). Iowa, with four, has more of these places than any other state: Libertyville, New Liberty, North Liberty and West Liberty.
Thirty-two places are named “eagle” — after the majestic bird that serves as our national symbol. (Places include cities, towns, villages and census-designated places.) The most populous such place is Eagle Pass, Texas, with 24,847 residents. There is also Eagle County, Colo., with a population of 47,530.
Eleven places have “independence” in their name. The most populous of these is Independence, Mo., with 111,023 residents.
Five places adopted the name “freedom.” Freedom, Calif., with 6,000 residents, has the largest population among these.
There is one place named “patriot” — Patriot, Ind., with a population of 195.
And what could be more fitting than spending the Fourth of July in a place called “America”? There are five such places in the country, with the most populous being American Fork, Utah, population 22,387.
<http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/population/005268.html> <http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/population/006563.html> <http://factfinder.census.gov/home/saff/main.html?_lang=en>

Posted by d-nadler at 12:46 PM | Comments (0)